IDIOMS

standard fare

(uncountable, idiomatic, by extension) Something which is normal, routine, or unexceptional; something which is commonly provided or encountered.

Example: 1893, "A Fast Train to Chicago," New York Times, 31 Mar., p. 3,
  Passengers on this nineteen-hour train will have to pay $5 more than the standard fare to Chicago, which on the Vanderbilt system is $20.
2011, "Standard Fare", Transport for Greater Manchester
  Anyone found travelling without a valid ticket will be issued with a standard fare of £100 which must be paid within 21 days. This charge will be reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days.
1990, Julie Sahni, "FARE OF THE COUNTRY: South India's Regional Cuisines," New York Times, 21 Oct.,
  They will not be eating tandoori chicken, lamb curry, nan or other standard fare, but exotic foods spiced with cinnamon, tamarind and pepper.
1943, "D.S.M to Olds," Time, 26 Apr.,
  More than any other man, slim, wiry Bob Olds made Flying Fortress a household phrase before Pearl Harbor. . . . Photogenic as a Hollywood ace, he and his B-17s became standard fare in newsreels.
1986, Rodney Crowell, "Album Reviews: Lyle Lovett & His Large Band ," Rolling Stone, 9 Feb. (retrieved 18 Sep. 2008),
  What makes Lovett intriguing is a grasp of emotional conflict that goes far beyond Nashville's standard fare.
2008, Brain Neal, "Review: HP Compaq Presario SR5610F," PC Magazine, 29 Aug. (retrieved 18 Sep. 2008),
  The black keyboard bundled with the system is standard fare.