IDIOMS

blow away

(transitive, computing, informal) To delete (data, files, etc.).

Example: Used other than as an idiom: see blow,‎ away.
  He blew away the dust which had collected on the book.
2012 October 31, David M. Halbfinger, "[1]," New York Times (retrieved 31 October 2012):
  Perhaps as startling as the sheer toll was the devastation to some of the state’s well-known locales. Boardwalks along the beach in Seaside Heights, Belmar and other towns on the Jersey Shore were blown away. Amusement parks, arcades and restaurants all but vanished. Bridges to barrier islands buckled, preventing residents from even inspecting the damage to their property.
  I didn't have to rake. The leaves just blew away.
  The kid just blew the clerk away.
  The critics were blown away by their latest album.
2011 February 5, Paul Fletcher, “Newcastle 4 - 4 Arsenal”[2], BBC:
  Newcastle were completely blown away during the opening half of the match but worked up a head of steam after the interval that saw them score four goals in 19 minutes against a bruised and beleaguered Arsenal.
2011 October 23, Tom Fordyce, “2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France”[3], BBC Sport:
  And when skipper Richie McCaw hoisted the Webb Ellis Trophy high into the night, a quarter of a century of hurt was blown away in an explosion of fireworks and cheering.

English Idioms

English Idioms - Any language is incomplete without the presence or use of idioms. The same is true with the English language. When talk about idiom, it is the phrase, group of words, or saying that has a non-literal (metaphorical) meaning that has become accepted in daily usage. The symbolic representation of idiom is much different from the definition of words present in the phrase or statement. There are a vast number of idioms and they’re utilized much commonly in different languages. According to the estimation, the English language has around 25,000 idioms.

Idioms are not just evolved around the language but they act like the building blocks of the said language and civilization. They also put great intensity to transform the language more dynamic and interesting. Idioms bring out a great illustration to the regular speech. In addition, the also brings a great sense of fun and mystery about them. Why are Idioms difficult to understand? It is mainly due to the meanings. Usually, they create a great hurdle for non-native speakers. It is a reason that idioms’ characteristics make them difficult and strange them to understand for the learners of the English language. What is the difference between idiom and proverb? An idiom is neither a bit of advice nor general truth. However, a proverb is a well-known saying; it represents a piece of advice or general truth.

On this page, you will get in-depth information about all essential English idioms along with their meanings. The best thing is that you can easily search the meaning of your desired idiom through the dedicated search bar. So just utilize this great resource of English idioms with meaning. Whether you are a keen learner or trainer of the English language, the knowledge about idioms will surely benefit you in the long run. It will not just enhance your vocabulary but will also assist you to strengthen your grip over the English language.