IDIOMS

get outside

(chiefly intransitive) Used other than as an idiom: see get,‎ outside.

Example: 1912, Edgar Jepson, The Man with the Black Feather (translation of Gaston Leroux), Small, Maynard, page 306 [1]:
  All this troop had come from the Palais de Justice; and when it reached the Buci Cross-roads, you dismounted, because you were thirsty, and wished before the ceremony to get outside a pint at the tavern kept by the Smacker.
1954, P. G. Wodehouse, Bertie Wooster Sees It Through, 2000 Scribner edition, ISBN 0743203615, chapter 10, pages 97–98:
  The sunset swayed before my eyes as if it were doing the shimmy, and a bird close by which was getting outside its evening worm looked for an instant like two birds, both flickering.
  I need to get outside. I've been cooped up for days.