IDIOMS

public eye

(idiomatic, almost always preceded by the) The focus of public attention, the limelight.

Example: 1892, Mark Twain, The American Claimant, ch. 10:
  The chief function of an English journal is that of all other journals the world over: it must keep the public eye fixed admiringly upon certain things, and keep it diligently diverted from certain others.
1909, P. G. Wodehouse, The Swoop! or How Clarence Saved England, ch. 10:
  [T]here had been the heavy work of seeing the interviewers, signing autograph-books, sitting to photographers, writing testimonials for patent medicines, and the thousand and one other tasks, burdensome but unavoidable, of the man who is in the public eye.
2013 Jan. 3, Luke Harding and Uki Goni, "Argentina urges UK to hand back Falklands and 'end colonialism'," The Guardian (UK):
  The president and her advisers seem convinced that by keeping the issue of the Falklands in the public eye she can embarrass London into eventual negotiations.